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obesity

Picture of David Mendez
Since the 2009 publication of “The Blue Zones," Dan Buettner has devoted himself to reengineering communities to improve residents' health.
Picture of Alyssa Perry
Cheetos. Oreos. Capri Sun. That's just a sampling of the items that can be found on the menu every day at city-operated rec centers in Los Angeles, despite a high prevalence of childhood obesity in the county and a nutrition policy that the city adopted in 2005.
Picture of Vikaas Shanker
Chocolate milk and fruit juice accounts for about half of sugar consumed by district students, according to a Sun-Star analysis of breakfast and lunch nutritional data.
Picture of Vikaas Shanker
Data shows children in Merced County are three times more likely to be obese than the average California kid.
Picture of Lauren Weber
The critical importance of nutrition during the first 1,000 days of a child's life is now recognized in feeding guidelines around the world. Why hasn't the U.S. gotten the memo?
Picture of Lenzy Krehbiel-Burton
Trump's new budget wants to replace a portion of food stamp benefits with a box of "shelf-stable" items. For Native families who have endured such government-issued provisions in the past, that's a horrifying prospect.
Picture of Lauren Weber
The first 1,000 days of nutrition can set a child’s course for life or perpetuate a cycle of poverty.
Picture of Antonia Gonzales
Navajo comedian, motivational speaker and advocate Pax Harvey is among advocates addressing health and wellness in tribal communities at a grassroots level.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The effort to limit children's daily sugar intake is gaining traction, fueled by emerging science, new beverage taxes, and new pediatric recommendations.
Picture of Barrington Salmon
“A lot of people think that these were poor African Americans moving out, but they were actually middle-class people, because the poor people had nowhere to go," one Georgetown researchers says of the city's rising number of displaced residents.

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