Skip to main content.

obesity

Picture of Amy DePaul

Low-income Mexican immigrants might be healthier than the overall U.S. population on some measures, but that health advantage fades as immigrants adjust to life in the U.S. That in turn can have worrying consequences when it comes to Latina birth outcomes.

Picture of Amy DePaul

Low-income Mexican immigrants with little formal schooling are healthier than the overall U.S. population, according to a number of measures. But once in the U.S., they lose their health advantages within a generation, despite the improvement in their standard of living.

Picture of Ryan White

What is the latest science telling us about the potential health consequences of breathing contaminated air?

Picture of David Danelski

The Golden State's air quality has improved dramatically since the 1970s, but still, on more than 100 days a year, Southern California is failing to meet clean air standards. Children appear to suffer the most with pollution laying the groundwork for multiple health problems.

Picture of Burt Hubbard

For the Dennis Hunt grant, Burt Hubbard and I-News produced a package of stories including video, photos and interactive graphics on Colorado’s new exercise requirements in elementary school. Incorporating student journalists in the project required a good, solid plan.

Picture of Amanda Mascarelli

Researchers are growing increasingly aware that the prenatal period and early childhood are exquisitely sensitive to external insults such as environmental contaminants.

Picture of Jason Kane

For a nation that produces more food per person than any other in the world, the United States has a major problem with hunger — and it only grew worse during the recent recession and its aftermath.

Picture of Linda Marsa

In 2010, when I started researching the health effects of climate change for my book, Fevered, it seemed like this looming threat wasn’t on the nation’s radar screens. I was pessimistic that changes could be made in time to avert catastrophe. But as I drilled down, I was pleasantly surprised to disc

Picture of Burt Hubbard

I-News at Rocky Mountain PBS posted today its package on the Colorado state law and childhood obesity. So far, Rocky Mountain PBS has done a 15-minute program on it and 9News has tapped a segment on the story.

Picture of Ryan White

Obesity has been very much in the news this week after the American Medical Association voted to label the condition a disease, a move that could eventually pave the way for expanded insurance coverage of treatments and further raise public awareness of a condition that affects about one in three Am

Pages

Announcements

Get the latest updates from top experts and a leading journalist tracking the story, as well as crucial context and insights for reporting responsibly on this fast-moving public health threat in our next webinar on Feb. 28 at 10 a.m. PT / 1 p.m. ET. Sign-up here!

Got a great idea for a reporting project on vulnerable families or health disparities?  We'll help fund it, and provide you with five days of all-expenses-paid training at USC in July, plus six months of mentoring. Click here for more information.

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth