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obesity

Picture of Fernando Quintero

When I heard recently that the National Association of Hispanic Journalists had accepted $100,000 from PepsiCo, with half of the money going toward scholarships and internships for journalism students, I was taken back to 1988 to a smoke-filled hotel conference room in Washington D.C.

Picture of Kate Long

Kate Long looks at the laundry list of problems that extra body fat can cause, including Alzheimer's Disease, sleep apnea and incontinence. This story is part of a Charleston Gazette series called "The Shape We're In."

Picture of Kate Long

This story is part of Kate Long's fellowship project where she explores West Virginia's epidemics of chronic disease and obesity and the efforts to reserve them. The series is called "The Shape We're In."

Picture of Tammy Worth

When Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced his intention to ban the sale of sodas larger than 16 ounces at some establishments in New York City, it caused a huge kerfuffle. Among all of the craziness of the debate, I couldn’t help but wonder whether or not this kind of policy really makes a difference.

Picture of Ryan White

What if the real answer to runaway health care costs isn’t to be found in the legislative boxing rings of Washington, but rather in something as seemingly simple as curbing our sugar intake?

Picture of Nathanael Johnson

The energy burnt by hunters and desk jockeys is the same, new revelations on thalidomide, strategies for disease prevention and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of William Heisel

This Thursday, as part of the 2012 National Health Journalism Fellowship in Los Angeles, investigative reporter Duff Wilson will address the story that has everyone talking about food lobbying: How Washington went soft on childhood obesity. I asked him via email about how he did that story.

Picture of Ryan White

If you could do one thing to ensure that you had a long, healthy life, what would you do? If you have less than a high school degree at 25, you can expect to live another 44 years, on average. Those with a graduate degree, however, can expect to live another 60 years, on average.

Picture of Nathanael Johnson

Coaching works for weight loss, the gathering storm against Obamacare, health effects of climate change and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Nathanael Johnson

Whooping cough resurgence, a better way of assessing body fat, the counterfeit Avastin saga and more from our Daily Briefing.

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The Democratic primaries are fast approaching — now is the time to brush up on the leading candidates’ latest plans for health care and their key differences. Our next webinar will leave you ready to dive into one of the election's most vital issues. Sign up here!

Get the latest updates from top experts and a leading journalist tracking the story, as well as crucial context and insights for reporting responsibly on this fast-moving public health threat in our next webinar on Feb. 28 at 10 a.m. PT / 1 p.m. ET. Sign-up here!

Got a great idea for a reporting project on vulnerable families or health disparities?  We'll help fund it, and provide you with five days of all-expenses-paid training at USC in July, plus six months of mentoring. Click here for more information.

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