Skip to main content.

Oklahoma

Picture of Cary Aspinwall
In Oklahoma, ranked No. 1 for per capita female incarceration, kids were going missing from school because their mothers were locked up in county jail. "This was the most complicated story I’ve ever done," writes 2016 National Fellow Cary Aspinwall.
Picture of Cary Aspinwall

Oklahoma's Tulsa County has essentially recreated a system of debtors’ prisons, critics say. Less noted, however, is what happens to the children when parents are locked up in county jail, whether for a few days or several months.

Picture of Lenzy Krehbiel-Burton

“If you’re not able to provide food, it makes it difficult to feel like you’re living a dignified life,” researcher Darcy Freedman said. “It’s a basic need and the mental health implications are very real. ‘If I can’t provide food for my kids or partner, who am I?’”

Picture of William Heisel

California is taking another run at requiring doctors to check a patient’s prescription history before prescribing potentially addictive drugs, with legislation passing the state senate yesterday. But will California legislators make the same kinds of compromises with providers that Oklahoma did?

Picture of William Heisel

Oklahoma is one of only a handful of states that require physicians to check a patient’s prescription history before prescribing potentially addictive drugs. How did Oklahoma enact this requirement when so many other states, such as California, have tried and failed?

Picture of William Heisel

In April, the governor of Oklahoma signed a bill that requires doctors to check a state-run database of patients and prescriptions before writing a new prescription for addictive medications. That makes the state a national leader in efforts to track such prescriptions and curtail abuse.

Picture of Kari Lydersen

Jose Arreola’s parents told him at age five that he couldn’t speak Spanish in public, and couldn’t tell anyone where the family was from, or his mom and dad could be taken away....

Picture of Shannon Muchmore

With the right data and good contacts to point you to personal stories, you can find where people are having trouble receiving medical care and tell an important story.

Picture of Shannon Muchmore

My three-part series on the difficulty of access to health care in Oklahoma has been published and has received positive feedback. There were hurdles and concerns right up until the run dates, but luckily I had no major difficulties.

Picture of Shannon Muchmore

Is Oklahoma headed toward a crisis in access to health care? Health experts say yes — for many reasons. This three-part series examines the problems, how they affect all Oklahomans and what can be done to change the situation.

Pages

Announcements

Do the competing bills put forward by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Sens. Charles Grassley and Ron Wyden have a chance of becoming law? This webinar will give an overview of the proposals and weigh in on the future of the battle to curb soaring drug prices. Sign-up here!

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth