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Opioids

Picture of Alexandra Demetriou
Addiction experts are pushing health care professionals to reexamine the way they discuss opioid addiction with patients and change how the establishment trains young doctors.
Picture of Fran Smith
A new study reveals just how often teens and young adults receive opioid prescriptions in emergency rooms, even as the crisis of addiction has exploded.
Picture of Teresa Sforza
Over the decade from 2008 to 2017, as the opioid epidemic took hold, the number of drug-exposed infants born per year nearly tripled in California
Picture of Jill Replogle
It was a vexing data riddle: Were opioids leading seniors to commit suicide? Or did they have major health problems that led them to take their lives?
Picture of Judith Mernit
Syringe exchanges and overdose kits aren’t always reaching poor and rural Californians, but advocates of the harm reducation approach are trying to make that happen.
Picture of Michelle Faust
Over the course of a week in March, Los Angeles stand-up comic and life coach Kate Romero opened up to KPCC about the pain she feels from degenerative disc disease and fibromyalgia.
Picture of Jill Replogle
Some seniors there now say they are looking for ways to take as few prescription drugs as possible. And many are turning to cannabis as an alternative.
Picture of Cynthia Poten
The 12-square-mile Hoopa Reservation in Northern California has been grappling with drug abuse for decades. A new reporting project aims to find out how Hoopa youth are navigating the realities of addiction.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
“What you’re hearing is that the pain killer problem has turned into a heroin problem,” Dr. Andrew Kolodny said. “That makes for a good story, but that isn’t really what’s going on.”
Picture of Ryan White
Narrative journalist Eli Saslow has an uncanny gift for capturing intimate, authentic moments in people's lives. He shared his methods with our 2017 California Fellows this week.

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