Skip to main content.

orthopedic surgeon

Picture of Sue Luttner

I am orthopedic history, walking.

Picture of Hillary Meeks

Tulare County, a poor, semi-rural county in California's Central Valley, has a one-third of its population on Medi-Cal — California's version of Medicaid. This is more than any other county in the state, yet the resources to care for the Medi-Cal population are few.

Picture of Sarah Arnquist

Records show that the financial troubles that forced the closure of Mee Memorial Hospital began as early as a year prior. Despite ambitions to deliver adequate patient care, the hospital's money problems continued to worsen.

Picture of William Heisel

Reading Dr. Michael E. Stoddard's history of infractions, like so many medical board records in Colorado, is a little like reading Tom Stoppard's play Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead. Each disciplinary document focuses on what happened offstage, omitting key details and leaving the real drama, tragedy, or dark comedy to the imagination.

Picture of William Heisel

So convoluted was Dr. Mark B. Kabins’ scheme to scam a patient he injured that you might need a whiteboard and several differently colored markers to make sense of it.

According to the U.S. Department of Justice, Melodie Simon underwent a spine surgery by Kabins, an orthopedic surgeon, in 2000. It went badly, and Simon ended up paralyzed.

According to the FBI, Kabins “knew that experts could say that he fell below the standard of care in his treatment of Simon, and that he could be sued.”

Picture of Julie Small

Two years ago, poor medical care in state prisons accounted for about one inmate death each week. A federal judge took over and the state terminated about 60 substandard physicians. That's left many prisons without enough doctors, but not the Calipatria prison about 100 miles east of San Diego. KPCC's Julie Small reports on one doctor who's quickly building the staff.

Announcements

In this webinar, will look at how the COVID-19 pandemic has ushered in a terrifying new reality for domestic violence victims, how organizations and authorities are trying to innovate in response, and how reporters can cover the story in their community. Sign-up here!

The 2020 National Fellowship is going online!Got a great idea for a reporting project on the impact of COVID-19 on vulnerable families or health disparities?  We'll help fund it, and provide you with five days of virtual training in July, plus six months of mentoring. Click here for more information.

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth