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patient safety

Picture of Luanne Rife
This story was reported with the support of the Dennis A. Hunt Fund for Health Journalism, a program of the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism.
Picture of Dana Ferguson
Dozens of patients have died needlessly due to errors made in Indian Health Service hospitals in South Dakota alone.
Picture of William Heisel
The California Supreme Court just armed would be challengers to the state’s prescription drug tracking system. And defanging the system would have an impact on patient safety.
Picture of Chinyere Amobi
California has been particuarly aggressive in its data-driven effort to curb high C-section rates at hospitals throughout the state. The results from early pilot projects have been promising.
Picture of Josephine Valenzuela
Should medical residents still be allowed to work 28-hour shifts? One doctor recounts her exhausting, nightmarish shift in the ER as an example of what can go wrong as the hours stretch on.
Picture of William Heisel
The tendency to blame the patient in the wake of deaths or complications often serves to obscure mistakes made by health care providers.
Picture of William Heisel
What would a more thorough effort to figure out what went wrong in health care-related deaths look like? Does medicine need the equivalent of aviation's black box?
Picture of David Lansky
Amid talk of ACA repeal, the signs suggest that the new Congress and president will diminish the emphasis on value-based health care. Here's what reporters should keep in mind.
Picture of Fred Mogul
There is a lot of public data on maternal health and New York City hospitals. WNYC's Fred Mogul makes sense of it so families can find the best hospital for them.
Picture of Fred Mogul
There’s a safety gap in New York City hospitals that puts the lives of black women at much greater risk than white women. Experts say better hospital culture can reduce the risks.

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