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Pediatrics

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Ace medical reporter Lisa Krieger of the San Jose Mercury shares timely reporting tips, with added insights from Stanford's Dr. Seema Yasmin and communications expert Glen Nowak.
Picture of Fran Smith
A new study reveals just how often teens and young adults receive opioid prescriptions in emergency rooms, even as the crisis of addiction has exploded.
Picture of Lauren  Whaley
Whether it's screening for developmental problems or catching adverse childhood experiences early, some doctors want to make the pediatrician's office a one-stop shop.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The effort to limit children's daily sugar intake is gaining traction, fueled by emerging science, new beverage taxes, and new pediatric recommendations.
Picture of Ryan White
A new study shows the gains made in getting kids to the doctor since the turn of the millennium, and clarifies what’s at stake should public coverage programs undergo significant cutbacks.
Picture of Ryan White
That's bad news, especially given ample research that has shown how critical engaging and speaking to young children is for building brains and spurring healthy development.
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From Colorado to San Francisco, recent headlines have cast a spotlight on the problem of kids ending up in the ER after ingesting marijuana disguised in sugary form. But the problem goes beyond pot.
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What to do when you can't find the right research for your story? A Florida newspaper pursued a novel collaboration with researchers on a new study on how the state's Medicaid program impacts children.

Picture of Ryan White

Zika has become the biggest health story of the summer, and the volume of coverage reflects that. But some of the most interesting reporting has started to focus on the longer-term effects of the virus on children.

Picture of Ryan White

In the U.S., social welfare benefits tend to impose tight restrictions on recipients. But in Manitoba, low-income pregnant women can receive a no-strings-attached cash boost. Research suggests it leads to healthier babies.

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