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pharmaceutical industry

Picture of William Heisel

Should a university president be penalized for standing by while university researchers put their names on scientific papers written by pharma-paid ghostwriters?

Picture of Laura Newman

Millions of American women were put on hormone replacement therapy before science evaluated the benefits and harms. Will men over 45 try testosterone replacement therapy too? Aggressive marketing of testosterone is on the rise.

Picture of Manoj Jain

About a decade ago when I was newly settled into private practice in Memphis, a representative for a drug company marketing a new and powerful antibiotic stood in my office and asked whether I would like to attend a consultants' meeting about the drug in Washington.

Picture of Angilee Shah

Today's Daily Briefing features a report on business of health care exchanges, a candid discussion of PTSD and a great metaphor for bloggers and journalists.

Picture of William Heisel

The Drug Industry Document Archive have has some incredible documents on the antidepressant Paxil that provide windows into a previously closed-off world.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

The long-awaited Federal Communications Commission report on American journalism, Information Needs of Communities, paints a poignant picture of the decline of health journalism at the nation’s newspapers.

Picture of William Heisel

When a company tries to mimic a well-known and respected brand, health journalists should be suspicious. Consider The Harvard Drug Group. Most people hearing about a pharmaceutical wholesaler with that name might assume that it was affiliated with Harvard University. It's not.

Picture of William Heisel

It can be uncomfortable asking people about their finances. In journalism, though, there is an obligation not only to ask, but to ask for proof — especially with clinical trials.

Picture of William Heisel

One of the biggest oversights a health writer can make is to cover a scientific study and not talk about its funders. William Heisel examines what can happen when a study's funding is overlooked.

Picture of William Heisel

Dr. Carl Elliott, a University of Minnesota bioethicist, has spent much of the last two years doggedly pursuing the case of Dan Markingson, a 26-year-old who killed himself during a UM clinical trial meant to prove the superiority of AstraZeneca’s Seroquel over its competitors.

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