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Picture of Kathleen Sharp

Every once in a while, a story not only finds a reporter, it hounds her. That was the case with my new book about two friends who blew the whistle on one of the deadliest prescription drugs in U.S. history.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Can you change healthcare in just 28 hours? Can a team of programmers save lives and change the world? Check out their worthy attempts from the Health 2.0 Code-a-thon.

Picture of William Heisel

Kansas City Star reporter Alan Bavley was just doing his job. In response to his watchdog stories on medical malpractice, federal officials yanked public portions of a national doctor database offline and threatened him with fines. Now, journalists are pushing back.

Picture of Jan  Mannino

Behind the operating room doors, anesthesia is the probably the only profession where there are two licensed providers, with different educational backgrounds, who can perform exactly the same functions.

Picture of Linda Perez

The anti-immigrant sentiment that some Latinas in Georgia are experiencing has led some women to refrain from scheduling routine medical exams that could save their lives.

Picture of Laura Newman

Millions of American women were put on hormone replacement therapy before science evaluated the benefits and harms. Will men over 45 try testosterone replacement therapy too? Aggressive marketing of testosterone is on the rise.

Picture of Kate  Benson

Do death threats to an isolated few make for good journalism or just sensationalism? And in pursuing the unusual do journalists run the risk of skewing the overall situation? Does having one source on each side of the issue really provide accurate balance and meaningful context? Questions are easy, answers are harder.

Picture of Kate Long

Journalist Kate Long's home state faces staggering health problems, prompting her project to explore West Virginia’s rising tide of chronic disease and obesity and the considerable efforts by its residents to reverse it.

Picture of Shannon Muchmore

Earlier this year, the New England Journal of Medicine named Oklahoma as the state that will have the worst access to health care when Medicaid expands in 2014.

Picture of Manoj Jain

About a decade ago when I was newly settled into private practice in Memphis, a representative for a drug company marketing a new and powerful antibiotic stood in my office and asked whether I would like to attend a consultants' meeting about the drug in Washington.

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