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Physicians

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The bill gained momentum as the pandemic put a spotlight on health care disparities and workforce shortages.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Ace medical reporter Lisa Krieger of the San Jose Mercury shares timely reporting tips, with added insights from Stanford's Dr. Seema Yasmin and communications expert Glen Nowak.
Picture of Benjamin Purper
This story was produced for the USC Center for Health Journalism’s California Fellowship.
Picture of Kyla Irving

Hundreds of health professionals, community leaders, policymakers and advocates will gather September 16-18, 2016 in Newport Beach, California.

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

Tradeoffs are a recurring theme when it comes to Obamacare plans — lower premiums often come with a smaller range of doctors to choose from, as a new database bears out. But as earlier research has shown, the relation between the size of physician networks and quality of care is, well, complicated.

Picture of William Heisel

Humorous videos make the point that police officers, firefighters, pilots, and others must undergo drug testing, but physicians don't. The same initiative is also fighting a sacred cow for California doctors -- the malpractice cap.

Picture of William Heisel

The Bakersfield Californian recently took on one of the most ambitious health care quality projects I have seen attempted by an outlet outside of the really big markets. One reporter, Kellie Schmitt, wanted to answer two questions: whether most of the doctors in Kern County were from another country and whether that mattered.

Picture of Sarah Kliff

Over the weekend, I took a long look at what the health-reform law does to address a looming shortage of primary care doctors. And the short answer is: Not much.

Picture of Martha Bebinger

What makes or keeps us healthy often has nothing to do with what happens in our doctor's office or a hospital. Angila Griffin made this discovery a few months ago when a community health worker stopped by to check on her kids, who have asthma. Jean Figaro came armed with vinegar and baking soda. They're cleaning products, he explained.

Picture of Annette Fuentes

Health care reform law will increase demand, but low salaries are discouraging young doctors from entering primary care.

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