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A jaw-dropping paycheck for a California health insurance CEO, niacin plus statins isn't an improvement, Vermont's new single payer bill, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

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As patient satisfaction surveys become more important to how doctors get paid, Doc Gurley finds them to be easily gamed and lacking in statistical validity — creating problems for both doctors and their patients.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

States cut back on HIV/AIDS drugs for the poor, Nevada's smoking ban lowers heart attacks and stroke, and a Medicaid success story, plus more in our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Angilee Shah

The first class of Online Health Journalism Fellows share three days of discussion about health, data and what happens when you combine great stories with online community engagement.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

President Obama’s support for a bill that would let states opt out of national health reform mandates early to come up with their own plans has been described variously as “a bomb,” a “major concession” to reform’s critics, or “calling the Republicans’ bluff.”  

But is it any single one of these things? Not so much. Here’s some context and a look at some analysis of Obama’s highly-publicized support for the Wyden-Brown state waiver bill, which he announced to the nation’s state governors on Monday.

Picture of Courtney McNamara

Taking root in Wisconsin, the union battles that are sweeping across the Midwest are about more than pay, benefits and collective bargaining. Attacks on the rights of workers are also an attack on America’s health.

Picture of Francine Kaufman, M.D.

Our final full day in Haiti is today. We went to the mountains with two board members of FHADIMAC, and from a high perch, the city of Port-au-Prince below looked like paradise.  But as we descended the mountain, winding out of our way and close to the edge to avoid debris, reality came back to us.

Picture of Alison Knezevich

West Virginia lawmakers want Florida's governor to reconsider his plan to drop a prescription monitoring program they say would cut down on pill trafficking.  

Picture of Alison Knezevich

West Virginia officials say they're disappointed that Florida's governor wants to kill a planned prescription drug monitoring program in the Sunshine State, which is a destination for people who deal pills.

Picture of Alison Knezevich

West Virginia smokers would pay $1 more per pack in taxes under a bill state lawmakers are considering.

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A global pandemic, a national reckoning with racism, botched school reopenings and leadership vacuums — it's not an easy moment to be starting out as a journalist. Join us as we hear from three youth journalists from around the country as they discuss the massive challenges confronting their generation. Sign-up here

Ready to take your journalism to a new level by honing your data analysis and visualization skills?  We're offering our highly acclaimed annual Data Fellowship through Zoom from Nov. 30-Dec. 4.

Do you have a great idea for a potentially impactful reporting project on a health challenge in California?  Our 2020 Impact Fund can provide financial support and six months of mentoring.

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