Skip to main content.

pollution

Picture of Ryan White

What is the latest science telling us about the potential health consequences of breathing contaminated air?

Picture of Ryan White

Southern California’s The Press-Enterprise newspaper recently published an extensively reported, in-depth look at air pollution in the Inland Empire and invited community members to a discussion about ways to improve the situation.

Picture of Alison Yin

Photographer and multimedia journalist Alison Yin, a 2012 National Health Journalism Fellow, shares how she chronicled the “invisible” struggles of children with asthma through photos and audio.

Picture of Cara DeGette

While covering the polluted mess left behind from where Colorado’s celebrated gold and silver booms were processed for more than 100 years, Cara DeGette literally followed her nose to report on a potential health risk no one initially wanted to discuss.

Picture of Katy  Murphy

The Breathmobile, an asthma clinic on wheels, helps hundreds of California schoolchildren receive the help they need to stave off trips to the hospital.

Picture of Katy  Murphy

In high school, Pamela Tapia spent more time at home with her inhaler than at school with her teachers. Now that she has moved just a few miles away from the poor air quality in West Oakland, for the first time in four years, she celebrated an asthma-free birthday.

Picture of Katy  Murphy

Each year, asthma attacks send tens of thousands of California children to the emergency room. Some are admitted to the hospital for days. In 2010, the state had more than 11,000 such admissions, costing an average of $19,000 apiece. Pollution plays a role.

Picture of Rebecca Plevin

Reporters Ruxandra Guidi and Erica Peterson live about 2,000 miles apart. But when they embarked on in-depth stories on environmental justices issues in their communities, they faced very similar challenges.

Picture of David Danelski

Children in suburban Riverside and San Bernardino counties breathe what is arguably the worst air in America. Diesel soot and other harmful particles and lung-searing ozone build up in the region, not only from local sources but from polluters in coastal areas.

Picture of Erica Peterson

Across the country, power plants spew mercury into the air, but it’s hard to make the case for stricter pollution limits without referencing the devastating effects heavy metals have on human health.

Pages

Announcements

Do the competing bills put forward by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Sens. Charles Grassley and Ron Wyden have a chance of becoming law? This webinar will give an overview of the proposals and weigh in on the future of the battle to curb soaring drug prices. Sign-up here!

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth