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poverty

Picture of Richard Lord
This story was produced as part of a larger project led by Rich Lord, a participant in the USC Center for Health Journalism's 2018 Data Fellowship.
Picture of Richard Lord
In the “Compassionate City,” governmental unity has helped to reduce child poverty rates.
Picture of Richard Lord
In a town kept down by county decisions and indecision, even the most determined families find it hard to rise above stagnation, deprivation, and violence.
Picture of Richard Lord
This story was produced as part of a larger project led by Rich Lord, a participant in the USC Center for Health Journalism's 2018 Data Fellowship.
Picture of Richard Lord
In southwestern Pennsylvania's fragmented patchwork of cities, boroughs and townships, children are likely to live in places without the resources to keep them safe, active and healthy.
Picture of Tessa Duvall
Marcus Wilson remembers the first time he saw his mom use crack cocaine. He thinks he was about 9. "She was doing it off a soda can," he said.
Picture of James  Causey
“I try to provide them with the tools to grow, so they can make that decision not to jump in that (stolen car), and not to pick up that gun, because they need to make those decisions when no one else is around.”
Picture of Brie Zeltner
This reporting is supported by the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism National Fellowship. 
Picture of Anna Claire Vollers
A new reporting project will examine child abuse deaths and near-deaths over a five-year span to gain a better understanding of how poverty contributes to child abuse across Alabama.

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