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Picture of Patty  Machelor
Fixing our foster care crisis” was made possible through major funding from the Community Foundation for Southern Arizona and additional support from the University of Southern California Annenberg Center's Fund for Journalism on Child Well-being. 
Picture of John Baackes
Proponents of Medicaid work requirements think it would flush freeloaders out of the system. And yet the reality is that most people on Medicaid already work.
Picture of Katharine Gammon
The new budget deal includes funding for the Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting program for five years.
Picture of Leoneda Inge
One of the busiest free clinics in the state of North Carolina closed its doors in 2016. A reporter decided to find out what that meant for the health of the county's disproportionately poor residents.
Picture of Lauren Weber
The first 1,000 days of nutrition can set a child’s course for life or perpetuate a cycle of poverty.
Picture of Martha Escudero
Juana, an immigrant mother from Guatemala, endured a terrible series of health and family crises. Yet despite her suffering and agony, her church urged her not seek out mental health help.
Picture of Anna Maria Barry-Jester
A FiveThirtyEight reporter on how she tackled an ambitious series on a huge, overlooked health crisis.
Picture of Cary Aspinwall
It's a disturbing trend: Across Texas, the number of women awaiting trial in county jails has jumped by 48 percent since 2011. At the peak this year in August, more than 6,300 women were jailed before trial, up from under 4,000 in 2011.
Picture of Leoneda Inge
The closure was a big blow for Warren County, an area of the state considered a primary care desert, where doctors are few and patients are often forced to go without health care.
Picture of Louise McCarthy
Community clinics in Los Angeles know they have to find new ways to get at the social factors that ultimately shape health if they're going to make a real difference in their patients' lives.

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