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A columnist calls for a more "humane" health care spending plan, a seventh-grader tries to start a lunch revolution, and food prices are going up for lots of unexpected reasons as we close out the week in the Daily Briefing.

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Some good news (finally!) about whooping cough, and a hospital mystery: why was a California hospital named as one of the nation's best when it's being investigated for patient safety problems? 

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Some lawmakers say they're disappointed that Senate President Earl Ray Tomblin slashed funding to fight substance abuse and to improve end-of-life health care.

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A doctors' gag order over fracking chemicals, good news on obesity prevention, and a rapping global health expert turned World Bank leader, plus more from our Top 5 Today.

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In the past few years, in fact, school lunch reform has become a cause célèbre in many school districts in the Bay Area as concerns mount about children’s health. And the Oakland school district, along with the West Contra Costa County Unified School District, is among the pioneers in injecting healthier food choices into their menus despite a paucity of resources and the challenges of re-educating taste buds.

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Studies show that residents living in neighborhoods near the Dumawish River are highly susceptible to illness and lower life expectancy, especially compared to those living in other areas of King County.

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Environmental justice is an old mandate getting a new life under Lisa Jackson, the first African-American head of the Environmental Protection Agency.

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The head of the House of Delegates health committee is calling on Senate President Earl Ray Tomblin to increase funding to fight drug and alcohol abuse.

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This story is Part 11 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

Nearly 33 years after the federal government designated Gary a health professional shortage area and 17 years after federal health authorities qualified it as a medically underserved area, Gary continues to suffer from physician shortages.

Those shortages are partially to blame for the poor health status of many Gary citizens, according to local doctors and hospital officials.

Gary is home to disproportionately high numbers of severely ill patients suffering from multiple potentially life threatening conditions, including heart disease, kidney failure, diabetes, hypertension, obesity and asthma.

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This story is Part 10 of a 15-part series that examines health care needs in Gary, Ind.

Methodist Hospitals’ financial turnaround has impressed hospital analysts and bond ratings agencies.

In May, New York bond-rating firm Standard & Poor’s changed its outlook on Methodist’s long-term bonds from negative to stable, reflecting its “improved operating performance and an improved balance sheet in fiscal 2009.”

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The COVID-19 pandemic has ushered in soaring levels of food insecurity and unmet needs in families across the nation. In our next webinar, we’ll explore fresh angles for deeper reporting on vulnerable families in your community. Sign-up here!

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