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PTSD

Picture of Tiffany Lankes
Many of Buffalo’s children spend years battling the consequences of violence and PTSD. School is often the best hope to support them, but the Buffalo district has been slow to act.
Picture of Harvey Barkin
Many Filipino undocumented immigrants remain fearful of seeking out helath care, even with the heightened outreach campaign for health care for undocumented children that began in May 2016.
Picture of Jenny Manrique
From meditation to soccer to art therapy, public schools in California are finding ways to help undocumented students navigate their emotions as they face new immigration policies.
Picture of Eve Troeh
Many New Orleans children come from tough backgrounds and have been thrust into a new school system that’s pushing hard to fast-track achievement.
Picture of Kathleen McGrory
Data allowed reporter Kathleen McGrory to show gun accidents involving children were a growing problem in Florida. But it was the story of one family that really made the difference.
Picture of Jenny Manrique
Once used almost solely to treat post traumatic stress in war veterans, EMDR has slowly become an effective therapy to treat a range of traumas, including those experienced by immigrants.
Picture of Harold Pierce
An invisible disease has been killing middle-aged white people in the San Joaquin Valley at higher rates than ever before. One doctor calls them "deaths of despair."
Picture of Suzanne Hurt
For the survivors of the San Bernardino terrorist attack, the battle to get the health care they need continues. And the county's broken workers' compensation system is only making matters worse.
Picture of Mallory  Falk
In WWNO's ongoing series on how New Orleans kids deal with levels of trauma many times higher the national average, we hear the story of 13-year-old Sherlae, whose tumultuous home life left her struggling at school.
Picture of Mallory  Falk
In New Orleans, children screen positive for post-traumatic stress disorder at three times the national average. WWNO’s Mallory Falk and Eve Troeh explore how the city’s education reforms after Katrina have made it harder for some students to recover from trauma, and to learn.

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