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PTSD

Picture of Mallory  Falk
In WWNO's ongoing series on how New Orleans kids deal with levels of trauma many times higher the national average, we hear the story of 13-year-old Sherlae, whose tumultuous home life left her struggling at school.
Picture of Mallory  Falk
In New Orleans, children screen positive for post-traumatic stress disorder at three times the national average. WWNO’s Mallory Falk and Eve Troeh explore how the city’s education reforms after Katrina have made it harder for some students to recover from trauma, and to learn.
Picture of Deepa Bharath
In many Asian communities, mental illness remains mired in stigma. A reporter in Orange County, Calif. explores how members of Korean, Vietnamese and Arab communities are affected by this barrier to care.
Picture of Jenny Manrique
Stress, depression and anxiety have ballooned among undocumented students at the UC Berkeley this election season, reports Univision's Jenny Manrique.
Picture of Jeffrey Hess
“I call it present traumatic stress disorder. When you have post-traumatic stress disorder it means the trauma has ended. With our people it is a perpetual trauma that is inflicted on almost a daily basis,” one lifelong resident of Bakersfield says.
Picture of Jeffrey Hess
Valley Public Radio in California's Central Valley reports on what law enforcement agencies in the valley say they are doing to help police officers cope with the mental strain of a violent line of work.
Picture of Lucy Guanuna

“We wanted to see the sun because the lights were on inside all the time. They would wake us up all the time, they wouldn’t let us sleep,” said one unaccompanied minor placed in a Texas detention center. “I wanted to cry. I thought, ‘God why am I here. Why did I come?’”

Picture of Nancy  Cambria

A year after Michael Brown was killed by police in Ferguson, a reporter returned to the neighborhood and spent months talking with families about how they cope with toxic levels of stress and violence.

Picture of Eve Troeh

New Orleans restarted its public school system a decade ago after Hurricane Katrina. But addressing the lingering trauma and stress faced by the city's children is a huge ongoing challenge.

Picture of Tiffany Lankes

A recent survey of students in Buffalo revealed that roughly one in three had seen someone shot, stabbed or assaulted in their neighborhood. The crisis is all the more harrowing given what we're learning about childhood trauma's life-long effects on health and well-being.

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