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PTSD

Picture of William Heisel

Sifting through the scientific literature on immigration and health makes one thing clear above all else: the health of immigrants is very much shaped by the particulars of their background.

Picture of William Heisel

Sifting through the scientific literature on immigration and health makes one thing clear above all else: the health of immigrants is very much shaped by the particulars of their background.

Picture of Ryan White

An estimated 60 percent of Skid Row residents have mental health disorders, and another 60 percent are addicted or have a history of addiction. Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are the most common mental health problems. Can finding them stable housing be a solution to their health woes?

Picture of Erika  Beras

Pennsylvania has seen an increasing number of refugees settling in the state. I will report on efforts to deal with health issues in this community, including the high rates of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder.

Picture of Angilee Shah

"Reporters may experience the same type of denial that firefighters do -- that they can't be harmed by what they're witnessing," says Dr. Vincent Covello. "You're expected to be above and beyond what you're doing."

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

The label on the malaria drug, developed by the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in the 1970s after another malaria drug used in Vietnam failed, warns of psychosis, hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, aggression, tremors, confusion, abnormal dreams and suicide. The drug still prescribed to US

Picture of Erica Mu

"Inside Out" is a public radio series that will begin a conversation about the mental health of Asian American Pacific Islanders (AAPIs). These radio and multimedia stories examine the experience and understanding of mental health from the perspective of several Bay Area residents of differing AAPI ethnicities. They reveal barriers to care, like...

Picture of Trangdai Glassey-Tranguyen

For months, Thuy Thanh Nguyen could not sleep. The refugee from the Vietnam War and a communist gulag would cry for hours, snap at her husband and children, and throw things at them.

Picture of Greg Mellen

Having people open up about atrocities that would make a normal person blanch can be difficult under any circumstance. Hearing the stories in translation underscores the complexities of understanding the effects of trauma on people from utterly different cultures. 

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