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public health

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Two of the country's leading researchers and a top reporter on gun violence in the U.S. discuss how to cover the epidemic of violence as an urgent and overlooked public health problem.
Picture of Rachel  Dissell
This reporting is supported by the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism National Fellowship. Other stories in the series include: Dear Cleveland: To learn, you first have to listen
Picture of Cara Angelotta
Expanding access to mental health care is not a prescription for preventing mass shootings, say two psychiatrists. Only confronting the easy availability of guns can achieve that.
Picture of Erin Schumaker
When neighborhoods change, it doesn’t just affect long-term residents’ housing options. It might be making them sick.
Picture of Anna Maria Barry-Jester
When it comes to local communities, zip codes are rarely a good way to look for geographic differences, and can cloud whatever relationships a researcher might be looking for. Consider what happened in Flint.
Picture of Rebecca  Adams
Immigrants on edge about broader enforcement under Trump have been skipping appointments and questioning whether enrolling in public health coverage could jeopardize their status.
Picture of Byard Duncan
Reveal’s Byard Duncan shares some tips from his recent investigation into the spike in foster care placements in states hit hardest by the opioid crisis.
Picture of Harold Pierce
Advocates for valley fever research give California Assemblyman Rudy Salas an “A” for effort for the "most robust" legislative effort to address the disease in state history. But public health officials and experts are split on whether the remedies proposed by Salas will bring improvements.
Picture of Rusha Modi
"The reality is that many medical students, residents and trainee physicians are illiterate in the basics of public health and health policy," says Dr. Rusha Modi.
Picture of Taylor Walsh
UC Irvine recently announced a $200 million gift to establish a new college of integrative medicine. The press coverage revealed a long-running bias from the media toward alternative therapies, one supporter argues.

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