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public health

Picture of Sarah Gustavus
Chronic illnesses, particularly diabetes, are a longstanding public health concern in many tribal communities in the Southwest. Sarah Gustavus and Antonia Gonzales examine how some individuals have overcome those challenges and are now sharing information and resources.
Picture of Linda Marsa
Houstonians may experience a public health crisis many orders of magnitude worse than the aftermath of other major storms.
Picture of Andy Krackov
From my vantage point as a former journalist who much admires what reporters can contribute, journalists can play a more activist role and in so doing help improve the health of the communities in which they live and work.
Picture of Molly  Peterson
City heat is a growing public health threat. It kills 60 to 70 Angelenos every summer. Even though heat causes more deaths and medical problems than most other natural disasters, it’s rarely identified as the culprit.
Picture of Harold Pierce
Experts in social behavior and public health weigh in on raising the public's valley fever awareness: create a simple, memorable message, turn that message into a social movement, and reach out regularly to find out if awareness has increased.
Picture of Harold Pierce
Valley fever infects more than 13,000 people a year in Arizona and California and kills more than 100. Yet they spend less annually on public awareness than one school district's monthly lunch milk budget and a parks and recreation department's yearly janitorial supplies.
Picture of William Heisel
Now that President Trump has officially declared the opioid crisis a national emergency, data can inform how to properly tackle the problem, community by community.
Picture of Ruxandra Guidi
In Southern California’s Eastern Coachella Valley, "promotoras" are part of a growing effort to address environmental hazards and survey residents about their other health and housing needs.
Picture of Ian James
As the Salton Sea slowly dries up, an environmental health disaster is brewing. In response, the Desert Sun found new ways to report on the rising health threat to local communities.
Picture of Molly  Peterson
If heat is the enemy, Marcela Herrera thought she was ready for battle last summer at her family’s north Los Angeles apartment.

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