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Picture of Jamie Hopkins
"There exists a class of hyper-polluters — the worst-of-the-worst — that disproportionately expose communities of color and low income populations to chemical releases," researchers write in a 2016 paper.
Picture of Elizabeth Aguilera
Experts believe they won't get the upper hand on the disease until they persuade enough people that a healthy diet and regular exercise can prevent it or minimize its damage if it has already struck.
Picture of Jennifer Bihm
This article was produced as a project for the USC Center for Health Journalism’s California Fellowship. Other stories in the series include: Tobacco companies put up a fight against California's Prop 56 UCLA SAFE program to help low income residents avoid second hand smoke Climbing Fences: Obstacle
Picture of Jacob Anderson-Minshall

Nearly a quarter of HIV+ Americans will be incarcerated at some point each year. For some it will be the first time they learn of their status. For others, it will be the first time they receive treatment for HIV. Unfortunately, when they're released, 90 percent experience interruptions in care.

Picture of Daisy Rosario

Toxic stress is becoming a hot topic in science and brain development. It’s also an emerging public health concern. Experts say the way to avoid toxic stress is through strong relationships that support children and their families.

Picture of Angela Hart

In California's Sonoma County, an alarming number of tenants live in housing so run down that it poses a risk to their health and safety. For Karla Orozco's family, the hazards included mold, rats and cockroaches, a broken heater, and sewage backups.

Picture of Angela Hart

The effect of squalid housing on people’s health is difficult to determine in California's Sonoma County, since there is no study, stockpile of data or government agency that tracks illness in connection with living environments.

Picture of William Heisel

When it comes to lowering high infant mortality rates, Rwanda has become an encouraging if unexpected example of what can be done with "big data made small."

Picture of Ryan White

The Cleveland Plain Dealer’s Brie Zeltner and Rachel Dissel are putting the issue of lead poisoning in children back on the map, publishing a deeply reported series of stories on the issue this week. The ambitious project is worth a closer look.

Picture of Joaqlin Estus

Alaska has the nation’s highest rate of people living without plumbing, and that can translate into real health problems for rural families. Despite the problem, state officials have declined to make the larger investments needed to improve conditions for the state's more remote residents.

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