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refugees

Picture of Scott  Anderson
Stories of undiagnosed PTSD among Hmong and Vietnamese American refugees are common in some California communities. What can their experiences tell us about future health impacts facing incoming Syrian refugees?
Picture of Lucy Guanuna

“We wanted to see the sun because the lights were on inside all the time. They would wake us up all the time, they wouldn’t let us sleep,” said one unaccompanied minor placed in a Texas detention center. “I wanted to cry. I thought, ‘God why am I here. Why did I come?’”

Picture of William Heisel

The Resilience of Refugee Children After War report put together by the American Psychological Association offers a a comprehensive assessment of decades of research into the psychological effects of the refugee experience.

Picture of William Heisel

The Resilience of Refugee Children After War report put together by the American Psychological Association offers a a comprehensive assessment of decades of research into the psychological effects of the refugee experience.

Picture of William Heisel

No matter their nationality, people leaving their countries as refugees often show signs of trauma, through PTSD, depression and other mental health problems. These findings provided one of the underpinnings for our Living in the Shadows series.

Picture of William Heisel

No matter their nationality, people leaving their countries as refugees often show signs of trauma, through PTSD, depression and other mental health problems. These findings provided one of the underpinnings for our Living in the Shadows series.

Picture of Lois Collins

For refugees, homesickness & loneliness are often inseparable — symptoms hard to untangle. Refugees in the throes of loneliness and social isolation may suffer depression, lethargy, headaches, exhaustion and more. It makes it harder to learn needed skills like language or cultural understanding.

Picture of Greg Mellen

Nearly 40 years later, Cambodian refugees who can bear telling their stories recall atrocities in vivid detail, with an immediacy that is palpable.

Picture of Angilee Shah

The embattled U.N. World Food Program reports that 13 million people have been affected by drought and famine in the Horn of Africa. It's a huge health story, but how can journalists report on it well?

Announcements

Get the latest updates from top experts and a leading journalist tracking the story, as well as crucial context and insights for reporting responsibly on this fast-moving public health threat in our next webinar on Feb. 28 at 10 a.m. PT / 1 p.m. ET. Sign-up here!

Got a great idea for a reporting project on vulnerable families or health disparities?  We'll help fund it, and provide you with five days of all-expenses-paid training at USC in July, plus six months of mentoring. Click here for more information.

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