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Picture of Binghui Huang
When is OK to offer a desperate source a ride, or a bottle of Tylenol? Knowing when to intervene is hard.
Picture of Chinyere Amobi

Dr. Glenda Wrenn of Morehouse School of Medicine discusses narratives of recovery and how journalists can do justice to the concept of resilience in their reporting.

Picture of Leila  Day

One way to present more culturally-balanced stories is to create more diverse newsrooms. But we still need to get better at talking to people in communities that aren’t our own. Here are some tips on how to do that.

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In recent years, the idea that journalists should focus on building the future of news with communities — not just for them — has gained traction. Josh Stearns profiles the work of Jeremy Hay, who has embraced this community-first approach with a local news service in East Palo Alto.

Picture of Ryan White

Readers and editors need and appreciate clear and concise explanations of health reform’s provisions. However, there’s no way you’re going to be able to cover all the complexities and nuances of any given topic in the space you’re allotted.

Picture of Debra  Sherman

As a Reuters journalist I have been writing about medical technology and health care for more than a decade. I wrote those stories objectively and never imagined any would ever apply to me. Now, I have Stage 4 lung cancer.

Picture of William Heisel

Suppose you arrive at work only to be told by your editor that today you're writing about a questionable new study claiming that radiation from the nuclear meltdown in Japan is causing thyroid disorders in U.S. babies. How should you proceed?

Picture of William Heisel

When an online news service wrote a story about potential health effects in the U.S. from the nuclear meltdown in Japan, people were frightened. The article was an act of fearmongering that could've been easily avoided.

Picture of William Heisel

Keep your interviews short, shut up and cover the essentials: here are more tips from a veteran journalist on how to manage a big reporting project.

Picture of Rob Waters

Former Bloomberg reporter Rob Waters describes his two-year-long quest to interview the “Berlin patient” – at the time, the only known individual to be “cured” of AIDS – and offers tips on how to find sources in the emerging field of AIDS cure research.

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