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rural health

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
The election breakthroughs in states such as Nebraska, Utah and Idaho suggest the national conversation on universal coverage is changing.
Picture of SJ Black
A reporter discovers firsthand the darker side of living in Northern California's seemingly idyllic Mendocino County.
Picture of Samantha Caiola
This story was produced as a project for the 2018 California Fellowship, a program of the Center for Health Journalism at USC Annenberg. 
Picture of Leoneda Inge
This report was produced as a project for the Dennis A. Hunt Fund for Health Journalism, a program of the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism.  Other stories in the series include: What happens after a rural North Carolina health clinic closes?
Picture of Leoneda Inge
The closure was a big blow for Warren County, an area of the state considered a primary care desert, where doctors are few and patients are often forced to go without health care.
Picture of Ed Williams
Research shows early childhood education is one of the most effective ways to prevent drug use later in life. That’s especially important in New Mexico's Rio Arriba County, where an opioid epidemic has been raging for decades.
Picture of Ed Williams
Española, New Mexico, has had one of the highest rates of heroin addiction in the country for decades. It’s a public health crisis that can create particular challenges for pregnant moms and their doctors.
Picture of Elizabeth Zach
In California’s Central Valley and rural north, more than a dozen hospitals have closed since the early 2000s. The closures often limit care options and inflict economic misery — some communities never recover.
Picture of Ryan White
New statistics show just how quickly rates of babies born with neonatal abstinence syndrome have risen over the past six years, particularly in largely rural states such as Kentucky. Here's why that's so worrying.
Picture of Elizabeth Zach
For residents of California's vast rural areas, where nine hospitals have closed in the past decade, a cancer diagnosis can be especially frightening. Here's why.

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Got a great idea for a reporting project on the health of underserved communities in California or on the performance of the state's health and social safety nets?  We're offering reporting grants of $2,000 to $10,000, plus six months of mentoring, to up to eight individual journalists, newsrooms or cross-newsroom collaboratives.  Deadline to apply:  September 20.

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