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rural health

Picture of Hannah Esqueda
While California's Medicaid expansion has helped provide first-time health insurance to residents throughout the Central San Joaquin Valley, patients living in rural communities still face tremendous obstacles to actually receiving care.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Two rural health researchers from the University of Washington offer their take on how health reform has impacted rural communities, and point to new trends that could improve access and quality of care.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

A long-deferred attempt to reform mental health care advanced out a House committee this week. Here's a look at how the bill seeks to change "the nation's broken mental health system," and some of the coverage to date.

Picture of Hannah Esqueda

Obamacare enabled a wave of residents in California’s Central San Joaquin Valley to get health insurance, but finding doctors has been a recurring challenge for many. Is there any relief on the horizon?

Picture of Ryan White

An updated look at youth suicides recently found that suicide rates in rural U.S. counties are double those of urban areas. Figuring out the causes behind the widening disparity is more difficult, but lack of access to mental health services is a big part of the problem in rural areas.

Picture of Joe Szydlowski

In Northern California's Shasta County, a growing number of young adults are consumed by heroin addiction. The problem has quickly grown in the past two years and, some say, is approaching methamphetamine’s popularity. The surge in drug use has fueled a rise in crime levels as well.

Picture of William Heisel

As hospital closures and physician shortages continue to afflict rural and low-income areas, Walmart is announcing an expansion of in-store primary care clinics in states such as Texas and South Carolina. Will this be the new face of primary care in rural regions?

Picture of Erica Mu

Telehealth has the potential to lessen physician shortages in rural areas and deliver care to those unable to travel. Proponents hail its efficiency. Why then has it been so hard to harness new technologies to expand care to areas and groups in desperate need?

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A report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, issued last week, shows that the incidence of valley fever cases is up an astounding 850 percent over the past decade-plus.

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Coming out of the dark will require coordination and significant sums of money. The Reporting on Health Collaborative asked patients, physicians, researchers and government officials to identify steps that could be taken now to change the course of the disease.

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