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Safety

Picture of William Heisel
As a reporter, you can do your part by both exposing the problems discovered by regulatory bodies and exposing the big gaps in the regulatory safety net.
Picture of Jessica Miller
Some children have been sexually assaulted. There are documented cases of child abuse. There have even been riots.
Picture of Meredith Cooper
In December, when people started to be allowed to return to their homes — if they were standing — benzene was discovered in the water supply.
Picture of April Ehrlich
Some people say they only had minutes to prepare before they had to flee their homes during the Carr Fire in Shasta County last year. Such short notice was extra challenging for seniors and people with disabilities.
Picture of Joe Goldeen
Even when the facts are presented and real people share their stories, some readers don’t believe it.
Picture of Monica Vaughan
This story was produced as part of a larger project led by Monica Vaughan, a participant in the 2019 California Fellowship. Other stories in this series include:
Picture of Joe Rubin
An investigation revealed that lead from the gun range contaminated the inside of the gymnastics center. The county health department closed the youth facility Friday until further notice. And the process of figuring out if vulnerable children have been poisoned from lead exposure is underway.
Picture of Wendy Ruderman
A dynamic team blended traditional street reporting with innovative scientific testing for a hard-hitting series on how the city's schoolchildren are being poisoned by lead.
Picture of Sonali Kohli
"They come in welled up with emotion, they’re crying and there’s no way they can concentrate on the lesson at hand," says a teacher at Dymally High School in South Los Angeles.
Picture of Lily Dayton
Journalists seeking to include the voices of survivors in their stories should start with the most important maxim: Do no harm.

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