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We are now on the GOOD Maker Challenge to win $2,500 to keep the venture going. For those of you unfamiliar with GOOD magazine, it is dedicated to covering innovative concepts, people and initiatives shaping our world for the better. They have launched this Challenge to bring together great ideas in which the ones with the most votes will get this stipend. Would you all be so kind to vote for us?

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California's long-running campaign to reduce air pollution has indirectly helped create a new problem: its oil refineries now produce more greenhouse gas emissions than refineries anywhere else in the country.

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It is three in the morning and Philip, 27, wakes up from a nightmare that he soon forgets. Vivid dreams and dizziness are recurring experiences, side effects he attributes to taking Atripla, a pill he consumes daily because he has AIDS.

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Is health reform to "blame" for sea changes in San Francisco's experiment in universal access to health care for city residents? Learn more and get tips for reporting on health reform in your own community.

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What one journalist learned while reporting on San Francisco's program to provide access to health care for all of its residents.

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Researchers from the University of California, San Francisco have quantified just how little physical education students at public elementary schools in the city get. At many schools, kids get far less than the state requires. 

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This was my final post as a blogger for Psychology Today.com. After two years and 110,000 page views, its editors decided my contributions "no longer met their editorial needs." Coincidence? You decide.

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Radio journalist Farida Jhabvala examines how one facet of health reform might help uninsured families in Fresno, California's poorest county - but political leaders there don't want to participate.

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Recent studies have found statistical links between pesticide use and an outbreak of Parkinson's disease in California farm towns. Researchers even know which chemicals are the likely culprits. What's the government doing about it? Not much.

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In 2007, San Francisco embarked on a rare and bold experiment, resolving to provide universal health care to its residents. Four years later, Healthy San Francisco has an enrollment of 54,000 people — between half and three-quarters of the estimated uninsured population. But the city has dug deep, and the program has earned less than expected from other sources. Can this ambitious program be sustained financially? The short answer, after a three-month investigation by the San Francisco Public Press: yes — but only if the economy picks up, federal grants continue to flow and businesses stop fighting health care mandates. The project, produced with the support of the USC Annenberg/California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship, appeared in November at SFPublicPress.org and as the cover story of the Public Press' quarterly broadsheet newspaper edition.

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A global pandemic, a national reckoning with racism, botched school reopenings and leadership vacuums — it's not an easy moment to be starting out as a journalist. Join us as we hear from three youth journalists from around the country as they discuss the massive challenges confronting their generation. Sign-up here

Ready to take your journalism to a new level by honing your data analysis and visualization skills?  We're offering our highly acclaimed annual Data Fellowship through Zoom from Nov. 30-Dec. 4.

Do you have a great idea for a potentially impactful reporting project on a health challenge in California?  Our 2020 Impact Fund can provide financial support and six months of mentoring.

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