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Picture of William Heisel
Journalists should find out whether schools near them are making even a meaningful effort to encourage better eating among their students. Here are some ideas to get started.
Picture of Vikaas Shanker
Chocolate milk and fruit juice accounts for about half of sugar consumed by district students, according to a Sun-Star analysis of breakfast and lunch nutritional data.
Picture of Tammy Worth

The surprisingly intense pushback against a proposed ban on school bake sales in Mass. is just the latest example of how hard it is for schools to improve their nutrition — and kids' health. 

Picture of Kate Long

Nationwide, schools with free breakfast for all report greater attention in class, fewer discipline problems, and fewer absent or tardy children.

Picture of Kate Long

Last summer, seven of West Virginia's poorest counties agreed to try cooking lunch and breakfast with fresh ingredients all year, five days a week. They would offer meals free to all students who want to eat.

Picture of Lisa Aliferis

The Los Angeles Times examines the apparent failure of the city's much-touted healthier school lunch program, which appears to be a "flop" with students. Journalist Lisa Aliferis says the program may be more successful than anyone realizes.

Picture of Kelley Atherton

In Del Norte County, groups such as the Children's Health Collaborative seek funding in a push to provide more nutritious meals at high schools and encourage students to make healthier food decisions.

 

 

Picture of Sarah Anthony

For the first time in U.S. history, the current generation of children have a lower life expectancy than their parents, due mostly to obesity and other diet-related diseases.

The strain on our health-care system caused by diabetes and obesity alone can be calculated in the billions. We are just beginning to see the extreme negative ramifications to our communal health brought about by the switch in the 50’s and 60’s from a local farming culture to a food culture based on super-markets and fast-food restaurants. 

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