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Screening

Picture of Jacob Anderson-Minshall
After living there for over a decade, I know San Francisco is uniquely situated when it comes to HIV and AIDS. But I wondered, How are other counties in California fairing in their prevention efforts?
Picture of Elizabeth Zach
The technology isn’t a panacea for all that ails rural health care today. Some areas still lack the required internet connectivity, and critics say telemedicine doesn't enrich a local economy in the way a hospital does, providing jobs and other community goods.
Picture of Emily Eckert

Criminalizing pregnant women and new mothers for drug dependency problems leads to poorer health outcomes while disproportionately punishing low-income women of color, argues maternal health advocate Emily Eckert.

Picture of Monya De

Dr. Monya De rounds out her top 10 predictions on what medicine will look like over the decades to come. Not surprisingly, she projects technology to play a big role, from surgical robots to telemedicine.

Picture of Ryan White

Amid rising awareness of maternal depression's harmful effects on children, CMS is telling states they can bill mom's screening and treatment to the child's Medicaid coverage.

Picture of Robert Fulton

Imperial County is a rural farming community tucked into the southeast corner of the state along the border with Mexico. According to the 2008 Imperial County Health Status report, the incidence rate of cancer in there has been consistently lower than state-wide rates.

Picture of Jondi Gumz

A retired doctor wonders why Dominican Hospital in Santa Cruz is sponsoring a visit by a private company that does screening tests that US experts do not recommend for the general population.

Picture of Amy Hansen

When it comes to health issues, the southeastern corner of Virginia usually is pretty average. That’s why I was surprised to discover a report that showed a city in my readership area has the highest cancer mortality rate in the state.

Picture of Amy Hansen

When it comes to health issues, the southeastern corner of Virginia usually is pretty average. That’s why I was surprised to discover a report that showed a city in my readership area has the highest cancer mortality rate in the state.

Picture of James Salwitz

What if you could take one pill and live 10 years longer? What if that pill also made you bald? What if the pill made you bald and nauseous? What if that one pill made you bald, nauseous, dizzy, impotent, and blind?  Would you take that pill? 

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