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sexual abuse

Picture of Lily Dayton
“When you’re a foster girl, you feel unwanted,” a 21-year-old survivor said. “You’ve been through so much neglect and abuse. And then when you have a man tell you, ‘I love you, I’’ll take care of you, I’ll protect you,’ you want to believe him.”
Picture of Marisa Kwiatkowski
At each turn, the people responsible for her safety failed her — her birth parents, relatives, foster parents, the Indiana Department of Child Services, school officials, therapists and others.
Picture of Ed Williams
Española, New Mexico, has had one of the highest rates of heroin addiction in the country for decades. It’s a public health crisis that can create particular challenges for pregnant moms and their doctors.
Picture of Olga Khazan

"Finding women who would be candid about their stories of abuse was incredibly difficult," writes The Atlantic's Olga Khazan, whose fellowship series explored interventions designed to curb child abuse.

Picture of Thy Vo

In Asian American families, where the subject of sex is particularly taboo and parents may lack sex education themselves, discussions about sex are less likely to happen. Reporter Thy Vo set out to document the consequences for young Asian Americans.

Picture of Olga Khazan

Victims of childhood sexual abuse are far more likely to become obese adults. New research shows that early trauma is so damaging that it can disrupt a person’s entire psychology and metabolism.

Picture of Ryan White

The media cycle seems perpetually filled with reports of violence perpetrated against or by young people. But there are some encouraging trends in the data on violence and abuse against young people. Researchers just aren't sure how to explain the gains.

Picture of Karla Escamilla

Our Univision series tells the story of a woman who quietly lived in a very violent relationship. Due to her undocumented status, she feared the authorities, she didn’t know where to find help, and mostly she was threaten to be deported if she said anything about her situation.

Picture of Kate  Benson

The Boy Scouts of America are in trouble – to say the least. But, do the boy scouts who were molested and abused have even more far reaching troubles?  After all, according to files released by the organization, many of the child abusers were not prosecuted, their misdeeds covered up for years.  The

Picture of Jane Stevens

"Adverse childhood experience" has become a buzzword in social services, public health, education, pediatrics and even business. Do you know your own ACE score?

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