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Sonoma County

Picture of Martin  Espinoza
The largest psychiatric facility in Sonoma County is not a hospital. It’s the jail.
Picture of Steve Mencher
Local politicians have long tried to find ways to better serve residents of this poorer, unincorporated section of Sonoma. Two reporters are now asking whether annexation can improve health.
Picture of Martin  Espinoza
A common dilemma faced by law enforcement officials in Sonoma County California and across the nation: What do you do with someone whose mental health crisis does not yet present a major risk of injury or death?
Picture of Angela Hart
Bad housing has emerged as a key issue in California's Sonoma County races for elected office since The Press Democrat published a four-part series investigating the prevalence of substandard housing across the county.
Picture of Martin  Espinoza

What happens when the only psychiatric hospital in California’s North Coast region shuts its doors? Where do people who are experiencing psychiatric emergencies find immediate help?

Picture of Angela Hart

The government framework set up to protect Sonoma County renters from unsafe and unhealthy living conditions has developed such extensive cracks that it has left many tenants without public recourse save for the court system, where help often comes too late to make fixes or fight evictions.

Picture of Angela Hart

In California's Sonoma County, some families face living conditions that include high levels of dangerous mold and other asthma triggers. When landlords don't act, problems can fester for years, leading to a host of health problems.

Picture of Angela Hart

Short of government action, residents living in substandard housing are banding together or stepping forward on their own to turn up the heat on unresponsive landlords. Some are seeking legal assistance to force repairs, with some cases escalating to lengthy civil lawsuits.

Picture of Angela Hart

In California's Sonoma County, an alarming number of tenants live in housing so run down that it poses a risk to their health and safety. For Karla Orozco's family, the hazards included mold, rats and cockroaches, a broken heater, and sewage backups.

Picture of Angela Hart

The effect of squalid housing on people’s health is difficult to determine in California's Sonoma County, since there is no study, stockpile of data or government agency that tracks illness in connection with living environments.

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