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Picture of Samantha Caiola

African-American children die at more than twice the rate of other children in California's Sacramento County, a new Bee investigation finds.

Picture of Ryan Burns

This story was produced as a project for the California Health Journalism Fellowship, a program of the Center for Health Journalism at the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.

Picture of Patricia Wight

In the final installment of Patty Wight's series on poverty and obesity, she looks at the power of social stigma and bias around weight, and the lasting effects they can have on a child.

Picture of Virginia Lynne Anderson

About 128,000 children in Georgia and an estimated 103,000 grandparents and other non-parental relatives could be affected by legislation scheduled to be introduced this week by Rep. Stacey Abrams (D-DeKalb) and others.

Picture of Karen Bouffard

Detroit has the highest rate of asthma among young children in America’s 18 largest cities, a problem that experts link to urban ills that could affect their health and learning for the rest of their lives.

Picture of Parimal Rohit

India-West’s examination of the impact of diabetes within the Indian population continues with a look at an attempt to legislate efforts to reduce sugar consumption, how one diabetic patient lived with the disease for nearly 25 years, and ways to manage the chronic condition.

Picture of Andrea Castillo

In a town whose problems already include air pollution, water contamination and poverty, the California drought has spurred a growing health crisis, worsening respiratory conditions and burdening those with other illnesses, such as 49-year-old Manuel León.

Picture of Ana Ibarra

As Merced County in California's Central Valley grapples with a rising tide of violence over the past few years, local behavioral health clinicians are paying closer attention to PTSD. The county has recorded homicides in record numbers over the past two years.

Picture of Karina Dalmas

Driving around South Central or East Los Angeles, it's common to see young crowds gathering outside mortuaries. Some call the area the "gang capital" of the United States, with more than 450 gangs with at least 45.000 active gang members, according to the LAPD.

Picture of Amy DePaul

Low-income Mexican immigrants might be healthier than the overall U.S. population on some measures, but that health advantage fades as immigrants adjust to life in the U.S. That in turn can have worrying consequences when it comes to Latina birth outcomes.

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