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Picture of Karina Dalmas

Driving around South Central or East Los Angeles, it's common to see young crowds gathering outside mortuaries. Some call the area the "gang capital" of the United States, with more than 450 gangs with at least 45.000 active gang members, according to the LAPD.

Picture of Amy DePaul

Low-income Mexican immigrants might be healthier than the overall U.S. population on some measures, but that health advantage fades as immigrants adjust to life in the U.S. That in turn can have worrying consequences when it comes to Latina birth outcomes.

Picture of Debra  Sherman

Canine therapy, in which patients socialize with dogs to promote healing and well-being, is a well-accepted practice in medicine today. It has been shown to help people suffering from heart failure, post-traumatic stress disorder and — for those like me — cancer.

Picture of Ryan White

New research says that a lack of time is in some ways like a lack of money: both are instances of scarcity that can have adverse effects on how our brains work.

Picture of Jason Kane

For a nation that produces more food per person than any other in the world, the United States has a major problem with hunger — and it only grew worse during the recent recession and its aftermath.

Picture of Erika  Beras

Pennsylvania has seen an increasing number of refugees settling in the state. I will report on efforts to deal with health issues in this community, including the high rates of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder.

Picture of Ryan White

One way in which health reporters can be useful right now is to seek guidance from mental health experts on coping with trauma. So what types of advice and observations have media outlets offered so far? Here's a sampling.

Picture of Raquel Orellana

Medicaid audit program, healthcare reform and small businesses, stress, Greece and environmental regulations.

Picture of Leiloni  De Gruy

Living with HIV or AIDS can be an unyielding source of stress that is not easily handled alone. It takes support, activism and a strong determination to not only survive, but thrive with a disease that takes a heavy mental, physical and emotional toll.

Picture of Greg Mellen

Having people open up about atrocities that would make a normal person blanch can be difficult under any circumstance. Hearing the stories in translation underscores the complexities of understanding the effects of trauma on people from utterly different cultures. 

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