Skip to main content.

substance abuse

Picture of Cary Aspinwall
In Oklahoma, ranked No. 1 for per capita female incarceration, kids were going missing from school because their mothers were locked up in county jail. "This was the most complicated story I’ve ever done," writes 2016 National Fellow Cary Aspinwall.
Picture of Richard Webster
Candince McMillian knew little about New Orlean's Central City neighborhood before she bought her home. Then two bullets ripped through her front door.
Picture of William Heisel
Banks tend to be very good at alerting you to potential credit card fraud. Can drug tracking programs do as good a job at flagging risky prescription scenarios?
Picture of Ed Williams
KUNM’s Ed Williams has been investigating the impacts of heroin addiction on children and families in Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. The area has had one of the country’s highest overdose rates for decades. Here he takes a deep look at the issue in an hour-long radio documentary.
Picture of Ryan Burns
A series of seven suicides within California’s Yurok Tribe in 2015 prompted the tribe to declare a state of emergency. In reporting on the aftermath, reporter Ryan Burns found himself facing some big challenges.
Picture of Ryan Burns
“Who has seen a behavioral counselor?” Roughly half of the kids at the Yurok Tribe's youth wellness event stepped forward. “Who has suffered from depression or anxiety?” Three-quarters of the kids came forward.
Picture of Samantha Caiola
Between 2010 and 2015, African American children in Sacramento County died at far higher rates than those of people under age 18 from other racial groups. These seven leaders are working to change that.
Picture of Michael  Hochman
New models in Britain and the U.S. take a larger view of the forces that shape people’s health. That’s because sometimes a patient needs an air conditioner more than a hospital bed.
Picture of Leonardo Castaneda
A data-driven look at opioid addiction in San Diego found that old assumptions about addiction hotspots were outdated. Reporter Leo Castaneda shares this and other field lessons he learned along the way.
Picture of Rebecca Plevin
The Los Angeles Department of Health Services will start approving hepatitis C drugs for active IV drug users. Until now, the department had withheld approval for anyone who had not been drug-free for at least six months.

Pages

Announcements

Cities across the country are rethinking how they police communities. In this webinar, we’ll explore proposals to reform, defund or abolish police departments, to help reporters better understand and evaluate such efforts near them. Sign-up here!

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth