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substance abuse

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Last week Antidote introduced you to Dr. Steven Balt, the rare physician to have the courage to open up about his personal experiences with the physician discipline system. The first part of our interview was posted last week. The last part is below.

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This is one in a series of articles, running the 5 weeks between Thanksgiving and New Year's, examining the relationship between housing loss and death in San Francisco.

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An article published yesterday by the prestigious journal The Lancet claims that alcohol is the most harmful drug of all, including crack cocaine and heroin.

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Dr. Kristen Peterson liked to get good and drunk, regardless of how many patients she was going to be seeing.

And the only people who knew were the members of the North Dakota Board of Medical Examiners. When the board members found out, they didn’t think it was information that should be shared with the public: people who might be treated by Peterson at a hospital or clinic.

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An estimated 22.2 million persons aged 12 or older were classified with substance dependence or abuse problems in the United States, representing 8.9 percent of that age group, according to the 2008 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, an annual survey by the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration. Of these, 3.1 million had problems with both alcohol and illicit drugs, 3.9 million had problems with drugs, and 15.2 million were dependent on alcohol.

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