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suicide

Picture of Fran Smith
Before she began her transition three years ago, Dallas Ducar struggled with depression, anxiety, substance abuse and the profoundly unsettling sensation “that things did not feel real.”
Picture of Cassandra Jaramillo
In communities of color, issues of mental health and suicide often don’t receive the attention they need. That's especially true of young black and Latino men in Texas.
Picture of Fran Smith
The suicide rate for boys ages 15 to 19 jumped dramatically in 2017, reaching its highest point in a generation.
Picture of Cassandra Jaramillo
The suicide rate has grown faster for young black and Latino males in Texas over the last 10 years, a Dallas Morning News analysis of CDC data found.
Picture of Katy Burnell Evans
A Virginia state senator voices impatience with the work of a commission he launched, which has secured mental health reforms but has not yet led to the wholesale change envisioned.
Picture of Cassandra Jaramillo
in 2017, the rate of suicide attempts for Hispanic teens in Texas was 11.4 percent, compared with 8.2 percent nationally, according to data from the CDC.
Picture of Sara Arthurs
While the Associated Press started advising reporters to avoid the word “commit” when covering suicide several years ago, many journalists and the public have yet to embrace the shift in language.
Picture of SJ Black
A reporter discovers firsthand the darker side of living in Northern California's seemingly idyllic Mendocino County.
Picture of Samantha Caiola
This story was produced as a project for the 2018 California Fellowship, a program of the Center for Health Journalism at USC Annenberg. ...
Picture of Samantha Caiola
This story was produced as a project for the 2018 California Fellowship, a program of the Center for Health Journalism at USC Annenberg.  

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