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"We Breathe Again" tackles the reality of high suicide rates in Alaska and the prevention efforts aiming to help. The film's director says, the movie is "about serious issues, but it’s also uplifting—a healing journey."

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At risk youth have an opportunity to make a change and get the help they need through a suicide-prevention camp put together by Native American tribes.

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Debbie Dolezal, 59, of Billings describe the pain, guilt and heavy-heartedness she still feels after her husband killed himself in 2008.

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There has been little public conversation and awareness about Montana's high suicide rates. That changed on Sunday, Nov. 25 when Billings Gazette Editor Steve Prosinski devoted an entire front page to the issue with two full, color inside pages, followed by front-page articles on Monday and Tuesday.

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Scott Rapson is among other school administrators in Montana who are taking a stand against teen suicide in their state and implementing the "Signs of Suicide" kits to help reduce the number of deaths.

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Miles City High School students know that the suicide epidemic among youth in Montana is staggering, which is why they created a one of a kind production to inform their peers of the choices they all have, and how to find help when they need it.

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Montana youth, Michael Woods attempted suicide in February 2007, instead he became a survivor and is now an advocate for Living Independently for Today and Tomorrow Inc.

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One after the other, Vena Mecklenburg's son suffered mounting setbacks. He married and divorced. Financial woes plagued him. He was involved with at least two failed business ventures. He lost his home. Then, his life ended in tragedy.

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After talking with their daughter's friends and reading the emails they got from her, it was easy for Garret and Tammie McFarland to see all the signs they had missed before 14-year-old Nicole committed suicide. This story is part of Cindy Uken's look at the suicide epidemic in Montana.

Picture of Stephanie Woodard

Native teens and twenty-somethings are killing themselves at an alarming pace. For those 15 to 24, the rate is 3.5 times that of other Americans and rising.

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