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On Nov 19, MSNBC reported that a woman pretended to be a plastic surgeon and talked two or more other women into allowing her to examine their breasts in bars in the Boise, Idaho area. She told them her name was Berlyn Aussieahshowna, which believe it or not, “was bogus” or so the account reads. She gave them the phone number of a real plastic surgeon whose office staff became increasingly concerned after receiving “a number” of calls looking to make appointments for liposuction and breast augmentation with Berlyn Aussieahshowna, whose real name is Kristina Ross.

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Happy Halloween! Don’t eat too much candy, or you’ll wind up like this poor pumpkin. Here's what we're checking out today:

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A new generation of heart devices is giving new hope to patients. Their use has increased 10-fold since January, but ethical quandaries loom: When is it appropriate to disconnect the device and let a patient die?

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When Dr. Harrell Robinson walked into the surgical suite to start a liposuction procedure on Maria Garcia he was already in a world of trouble.

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Maria Garcia smoked.

That was her one big vice, according to her brother and her estranged husband.

This otherwise healthy 39-year-old visited the doctors at Hills Surgical Center in Anaheim because she didn’t like the way she looked. To remedy that, the surgeons scheduled a series

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Dr. Manoj Jain takes a look at the patient doctor surveys that were conducted in Memphis and gives a doctor's point of view on choosing a primary care physician.

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Everybody has worked with a jerk. Someone who steals credit for your work. Someone who berates their employees behind closed doors but turns on the smiles for the executives. Someone who is loathe to admit a mistake.

When that jerk is a physician, the consequences are steeper than bruised egos or misbegotten bonus pay. Patients can end up with the wrong medication. Surgery can be performed on the wrong organ. Someone who had an excellent chance at surviving a disease can be dead in seconds.

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As one of the largest, most expansive cities in the country, Los Angeles faces huge challenges in getting out health-related messages that resonate with the city's myriad cultures. Lack of health literacy, or having trouble understanding either the benefits or the details of modern, often Western medicine, has ripple effects, including patients being less likely to seek preventive care and more likely to use hospital emergency rooms for routine medical care. 

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Who hasn’t come home from work with a company pen in their pocket? Used the work printer for directions to a restaurant on a Friday afternoon? Answered a call from their mom on the company cell phone?

In that spirit, we could consider Dr. Duane Stillions just one of the rest of us.

If only he weren’t a children’s physician with a drug habit.

Stillions, a 42-year-old anesthesiologist, was caught in May 2009 by Children’s National Medical Center in Washington DC taking painkillers that were meant for kids undergoing surgery.

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Do the competing bills put forward by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Sens. Charles Grassley and Ron Wyden have a chance of becoming law? This webinar will give an overview of the proposals and weigh in on the future of the battle to curb soaring drug prices. Sign-up here!

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