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trauma

Picture of Mabinty Quarshie
Witnessing abuse carries the same risk of harm to children's mental health and learning as if the children had been abused directly, new research shows.
Picture of Michael Hill
Correspondent Michael Hill reported this story with the support of the Dennis A. Hunt Fund for Health Journalism, a program of the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism.
Picture of Jonetta Barras
DC education and health advocates, parents, students and others argue that something like a Marshall Plan is needed to deal with a crisis in childhood trauma.
Picture of Michael Hill
Correspondent Michael Hill reported this story with the support of the Dennis A. Hunt Fund for Health Journalism, a program of the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism.
Picture of Laura Klivans
A reporter set out to discover why trauma rates were so high in the community of Paradise, Calif. Then the deadliest wildfire in state history destroyed the town.
Picture of James  Causey
Today, nearly 37 years later, the call seems exceptionally ordinary: Investigate a noise complaint from a resident at an apartment building at North 10th and West Walnut streets. James E. Causey’s reporting on this project was completed with the support of a USC Annenberg Center for H
Picture of James  Causey
Spoken word artists Tina Nixon and Kwabena Antoine Nixon have helped people enveloped in trauma in Milwaukee open up about their innermost fears.
Picture of Tessa Duvall
Marcus Wilson remembers the first time he saw his mom use crack cocaine. He thinks he was about 9. "She was doing it off a soda can," he said.
Picture of Tessa Duvall
The children who end up buried the deepest in the criminal justice system were often victims of extensive trauma before they played a part in killing others.
Picture of Tessa Duvall
This article and others forthcoming on this topic are being produced as part of a project for the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism’s National Fellowship, in conjunction with the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.

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If you're a journalist with big ideas who wants your work to matter, the Center for Health Journalism invites you to apply for the all-expenses-paid National Fellowship -- five days of stimulating discussions in Los Angeles about social and health safety net issues, plus reporting and engagement grants of $2,000-$12,000 and six months of expert mentoring.

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