Skip to main content.

treatment

Picture of Giles Bruce
Prevention is always king, but what does the evidence say about the best way to treat kids who have already suffered abuse?
Picture of Nuala Sawyer
For many unhoused people living on San Francisco streets, maintaining good physical health is fairly low on a long daily to-do list. Basic survival — finding water, food, and shelter — can occupy much of one’s day and energy.
Picture of William Heisel
When stories make bold claims about life expectancies chopped by decades or rates of chronic diseases skyrocketing for those with higher scores, they can create heightened anxiety without a real solution.
Picture of Nicole Knight
When I set out to explore disparities in sexually transmitted diseases, I noticed few outlets elevated the voices and stories of individuals most affected by STDs. Then I lost my job.
Picture of Amanda Curcio
Support for Curcio’s reporting on this project also came from the Fund for Journalism on Child Well-Being, a program of the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism at the University of Southern California. Other stories in this series include:
Picture of Giles Bruce
Kateri Whiteside looked at the pictures of her six kids on the wall: boys and girls, from toddlers to adults. She hasn't seen some of them for years.
Picture of Amanda Curcio
The White River Regional Juvenile Detention Center will stop incarcerating kids by this summer.
Picture of Michael Hill
"Ashanti Jones’ story was so overwhelming it made me cry during the interview — a first in my four-decade career," writes broadcast reporter Michael Hill.
Picture of Amanda Curcio
While reporting on the juvenile justice beat for about two years, youth advocates, public defenders, juvenile re-entry workers and probation staff told me too many kids slipped through the cracks.

Pages

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth