Skip to main content.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Picture of Monya De

While innovation will spur many changes in health care, current trends may also create unwelcome developments. Dr. Monya De offers her first five of 10 predictions on what medicine will look like in the decades to come.

Picture of SE Ruckman

Despite living in a state where Medicaid was not expanded, Oklahoma’s 38 federally recognized tribes have found a way to state tribal liaison Sally Carter. And she has found her way to them.

Picture of Angilee Shah

"Reporters may experience the same type of denial that firefighters do -- that they can't be harmed by what they're witnessing," says Dr. Vincent Covello. "You're expected to be above and beyond what you're doing."

Picture of Sue Luttner

A commutation of sentence for grandmother Shirley Ree Smith has brought the medical debate around shaken baby syndrome back into the news.

Picture of Bernice Yeung

Nearly every day, Arleen Hernandez battles an aging septic tank that backs up into her toilet and shower. Upon moving to Parklawn in 1986, she didn’t realize her new neighborhood lacks basic public services.

Picture of Angilee Shah

Today's Daily Briefing features reporters' struggles to access health information, the health of truck drivers and women who have just given birth, and a must-read about what it means to die in prison.

Picture of Ryan McNeill

Parkland Memorial Hospita has for years been one of the state’s worst-performing hospitals on a broad federal measure of patient safety, a Dallas Morning News analysis shows. Hospital representatives accepted the accuracy of the calculations, but they questioned how well the data reflected actual performance and current hospital conditions. 

 
Picture of Ryan McNeill

To identify rates of potentially preventable medical harm, The Dallas Morning News  analyzed nearly 9 million patient-level records from hospitals across Texas.

Picture of Angilee Shah

It was an eventful weekend in the news. Today's Daily Briefing will help you catch up on health in the debt deal, learn surprising facts about clinical trials abroad and violence in hospitals, and connect with tough-but-important stories about famine and homelessness.

Picture of Maureen OHagan

For a decade, Washington has been fighting for your life. Yet you might not even know this because it's been a quiet battle, a fight designed to work its way into the fabric of your life. It's about your weight — or, more important, the weight of your children.

Pages

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth