Skip to main content.

U.S. government

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

Faced with two mad cow scares this year, both US and Brazil authorities have debuted the concept of "atypical mad cow disease." Spontaneously-erupting mad cow that has no known cause and may be a genetic mutation has seldom if ever been reported before.

Picture of Cindy Uken

One after the other, Vena Mecklenburg's son suffered mounting setbacks. He married and divorced. Financial woes plagued him. He was involved with at least two failed business ventures. He lost his home. Then, his life ended in tragedy.

Picture of Ryan McNeill

Parkland Memorial Hospita has for years been one of the state’s worst-performing hospitals on a broad federal measure of patient safety, a Dallas Morning News analysis shows. Hospital representatives accepted the accuracy of the calculations, but they questioned how well the data reflected actual performance and current hospital conditions. 

 
Picture of William Heisel

Bioethicist and writer Carl Elliott used many documents to piece together the story of how a research team desperate for patients helped create a pipeline for clinical trial participants by setting up a psychiatric ward. Here's how he did it.

Picture of William Heisel

Before he was busted for prescribing drugs over the Internet, Dr. Stephen Hollis wrote 43,930 prescriptions for drugs in just one year, about about 170 scrips every workday. How is that even possible? Hollis tells me how.

Picture of Danielle Ivory

Shouldn't health insurers be celebrating the 16 million potential new patients being added to the rolls? Maybe not...

Picture of Lisa Jones

The construction of a dam near an Indian reservation on the Missouri River forced residents to less fertile land and put an end to their farming habits. Since then, American Indians have experienced a lack of nutrition, leading to diabetes, hypertension and obesity.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Medical pot purveyors can't escape the tax man, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

A new Institute of Medicine report offers some excellent fodder for stories on "comparative effectiveness research," which examines whether and why some medical treatments are more effective than others.

You'll be hearing a lot about the comparative effectiveness buzzword as the national health reform debate unfolds, because it's seen as crucial in in lowering health costs. Why spend money on drug-eluting stents for heart disease, for example, if plain old stents might just keep people alive longer?

Pages

Announcements

Cities across the country are rethinking how they police communities. In this webinar, we’ll explore proposals to reform, defund or abolish police departments, to help reporters better understand and evaluate such efforts near them. Sign-up here!

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth