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USA Today

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"One of the first lessons we learned was the need for patience with survivors. We were often asking people to relive their trauma when we interviewed them and that carried a high emotional cost for families."
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How a reporting team overcame countless hurdles to tell a new story of how children are affected by the family violence they experience, from the time they are in utero through childhood and after.
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USA Today's Liz Szabo knows that criticism comes with the territory, but she doesn't respond to name-calling. She will engage in constructive and civil conversation with readers who are genuinely concerned.

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USA Today reporter Liz Szabo breaks news for a living. So she had to squeeze her investigation of Dr. Stanley Burzynski and the patients who died under his care into the few hours or minutes between breaking daily news.

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Liz Szabo's USA Today story -- Doctor accused of selling false hope to families -- is one of the best medical investigations I have read. Here are a few lessons from the piece.

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Could there be anything worse for the chicken industry than this month's outbreak of an antibiotic-resistant strain of salmonella that hospitalized 42 percent of everyone who got it -- almost 300 in 18 states? Yes.

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Health writers can help readers understand that less treatment sometimes makes the most sense.

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I rarely read an entire story on my phone, but when I saw the headline Dirty medical needles put tens of thousands at risk in USA TODAY on Thursday, I had to click through all nine pages of it.

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It's great to get a national reporting internship. It's even better when you land an important lead poisoning story on the front page of USA Today - after only a month on the job.

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Announcements

Get the latest updates from top experts and a leading journalist tracking the story, as well as crucial context and insights for reporting responsibly on this fast-moving public health threat in our next webinar on Feb. 28 at 10 a.m. PT / 1 p.m. ET. Sign-up here!

Got a great idea for a reporting project on vulnerable families or health disparities?  We'll help fund it, and provide you with five days of all-expenses-paid training at USC in July, plus six months of mentoring. Click here for more information.

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