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Valley fever

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The National Institutes of Health is now providing critical support to multiple studies on valley fever. Such research could yield critical new breakthroughs in our understanding of the long-overlooked disease.
Picture of Harold Pierce
“Valley fever is almost certainly underreported, due to physicians and the public not being familiar with the disease,” said one infectious disease specialist. Reliable estimates of valley fever cases are still lacking.
Picture of Harold Pierce
New sensors in development at the CDC could provide a breakthrough in valley fever detection and prevention throughout the Southwestern United States.
Picture of Kerry Klein
A new skin test called Spherusol can detect whether a person has developed immunity to valley fever. But despite its promise, the test still isn’t in wide use.
Picture of Harold Pierce
As recently as August, Calif. health officials predicted the number of valley fever cases this year would go down. Now it’s shaping up to be one of the worst years on record.
Picture of William Heisel

You don’t have to be a math whiz to make this calculation: If you see a chart, map or visualization, there must be data behind it. It's a good practice for reporters to ask for the underlying data.

Picture of William Heisel

Last week, the Health Officers Assoc. of California announced it will launch a continuing medical education program for valley fever. It shouldn't have required widespread press and the new U.S. House majority leader to get to this point.

Picture of William Heisel

The CDC has used cutting-edge DNA tests to place valley fever firmly in Washington state. That means the fungus is likely to show up in other western states. A more complete map of valley fever’s true range should soon emerge as the testing effort expands.

Picture of William Heisel

The CDC has tracked valley fever northward to Washington state. The alarming new finding required the use of sophisticated new testing techniques that carefully separated fungal DNA from the soil. Here's how it happened.

Picture of William Heisel

New research proves for the first time that the fungus that causes valley fever is living in Washington state, far outside its traditional boundaries in the Southwest U.S. and Mexico. While the findings aren't cause for panic, the news suggests clinicians should be on the watch for symptoms.

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