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violence

Picture of Susan  Abram
A special edition of Health Affairs explores the long shadow of violence on health — and how public policy might respond.
Picture of Issac Bailey
How often do young people in neighborhoods in which gang and drug violence are a daily occurrence receive help and services before they get sent to the alternative school, arrested, or worse?
Picture of Michael Hill
"Ashanti Jones’ story was so overwhelming it made me cry during the interview — a first in my four-decade career," writes broadcast reporter Michael Hill.
Picture of Lily Dayton
Journalists seeking to include the voices of survivors in their stories should start with the most important maxim: Do no harm.
Picture of Sonali Kohli
Sonali Kohli worked on this project while participating in the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism's 2018 California Fellowship.
Picture of Sonali Kohli
Sonali Kohli worked on this project while participating in the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism's 2018 California Fellowship.
Picture of Sonali Kohli
Sonali Kohli worked on this project while participating in the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism's 2018 California Fellowship.
Picture of Jonetta Barras
This video was produced as a project supported by the Fund for Journalism on Child Well-Being, a program of the University of Southern California Annenberg Center for Health Journalism.
Picture of James  Causey
In Milwaukee, therapists, social workers and criminal justice reform officials are focusing new attention on the well-being of those who suffer traumatic experiences as children. James E. Causey’s reporting on this project was completed with the support of a USC Annenberg Center for Health
Picture of Tessa Duvall
Prison inmates detail the crippling obstacles faced by many of the Jacksonville, Florida children involved in homicides.

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