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Washington

Picture of Will James
This story was produced as part of a larger project led by Will James, a participant in the 2019 National Fellowship. Other stories in this series include: Introducing: Outsiders, a story about homelessness Episode 2: What Happened Here
Picture of Barrington Salmon
My original premise was to look to see what if any negative effects gentrification had or has had on the lives, health, well-being and prospects of displaced residents in Washington, D.C.
Picture of Jonetta Barras
“I have to meet this guy and have sex with him. If I don’t, then he and his friends are going to rape my little sister,” a student at Frank Ballou High School in Ward 8’s Congress Heights told her teacher.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
After the state expanded Medicaid under the ACA, Washington state health officials noticed that people who were focused on survival were letting their health needs fall by the wayside.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

In Washington state, a lack of psychiatric beds has led to a court ruling that says patients can't be held against their will in ERs while awaiting long-term care. While the ACA has expanded benefits, it has also revealed just how scarce resources often are.

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

The gun lobby loves the short memory of the American public and the news media. Who remembers that Aaron Alexis killed 12 at Washington's Navy Yard just three months ago, legally buying a shotgun two days before the rampage.

Picture of Jose Luis Buen Abad

Many immigrants in the state of Washington do not have permanent work and find jobs as day laborers, where they have more accidents and hurt themselves more on the job than fellow workers in the same industries.

Picture of Patricia Guadalupe

When most people think of Washington, D.C., the White House, the Washington Monument, the Smithsonian, and other tourist destinations usually come to mind. But Washington is also home to a growing number of Latino residents, including many Central Americans.

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

Faced with two mad cow scares this year, both US and Brazil authorities have debuted the concept of "atypical mad cow disease." Spontaneously-erupting mad cow that has no known cause and may be a genetic mutation has seldom if ever been reported before.

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