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Dori Maynard, the president of the Robert C. Maynard Institute for Journalism Education, spends her life talking to journalists about how factors like race, gender, and age affect our understanding of what's news and our ability to empathize with our subjects. She spoke compellingly about these issues just a few weeks ago at our most recent Fellowship sessions. As she waited for a foundation executive earlier this month in the lobby of a Hampton Inn in Washington, she had a chilling firsthand experience that will no doubt inform her presentations to come.

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Concern refills the lives of more than thirty dialysis patients in Atlanta. They are reaching the date will no longer receive the treatment that keeps them alive. On 31 August contract expires on Grady Hospital signed with Fresenius private clinic for further treatment of these patients, mostly illegal immigrants.
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Rebecca Morley is the executive director of the National Center for Healthy Housing (NCHH),where she leads a multi‐disciplinary staff in creating healthy and safe housing for children. Ms.Morley spearheaded NCHH’s work in the Gulf Coast region following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. She has authored numerous articles and publications on housing‐related health hazards. Before joining NCHH in 2002, Ms. Morley was a senior associate with ICF Consulting in Washington, D.C., where she advised clients, including federal agencies, on the development of lead poisoning prevention. Ms.

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Ted Corbin is an assistant professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the Drexel University College of Medicine and co-director of the Center for Nonviolence & Social Justice there. He also serves as the medical director for the center's Healing Hurt People program, an emergency department-based intervention strategy for victims of intentional injury. Dr. Corbin received his master’s degree in public policy from the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University.

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Dr. Manoj Jain takes a look at the patient doctor surveys that were conducted in Memphis and gives a doctor's point of view on choosing a primary care physician.

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Mary Lee knows firsthand the fallout from living in an area without proper access to fresh, healthy food: She drives past three South Los Angeles grocery stores offering expired tortillas and wilted

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So it’s been three months already since health reform passed, and journalists around the country are still looking for ways to keep this story fresh. Earlier, I wrote about lessons you can learn from some top  Washington DC health reporters, with an eye on Sept. 23, when the next set of new provisions takes effect.

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For the past year and a half, Julie Sullivan at the Oregonian, one of the country’s most consistent and skilled investigative reporters, has been writing about troops that were exposed to the cancer-causing chemical hexavalent chromium in Iraq.

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Decades of anti-smoking public health campaigns have turned into background noise. We all know smoking is bad for us, but yet we allow ourselves to get caught up in the sexiness of it when a show like Mad Men comes along. Even our president has admitted to a regular habit.

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Who hasn’t come home from work with a company pen in their pocket? Used the work printer for directions to a restaurant on a Friday afternoon? Answered a call from their mom on the company cell phone?

In that spirit, we could consider Dr. Duane Stillions just one of the rest of us.

If only he weren’t a children’s physician with a drug habit.

Stillions, a 42-year-old anesthesiologist, was caught in May 2009 by Children’s National Medical Center in Washington DC taking painkillers that were meant for kids undergoing surgery.

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Get the latest updates from top experts and a leading journalist tracking the story, as well as crucial context and insights for reporting responsibly on this fast-moving public health threat in our next webinar on Feb. 28 at 10 a.m. PT / 1 p.m. ET. Sign-up here!

Got a great idea for a reporting project on vulnerable families or health disparities?  We'll help fund it, and provide you with five days of all-expenses-paid training at USC in July, plus six months of mentoring. Click here for more information.

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