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As part of the Center for Health Journalism Fellowship, journalists work with a senior fellow to develop a special project. Recent projects have examined health disparities by ZIP code in the San Francisco Bay Area, anxiety disorders and depression in the Hispanic immigrant community in Washington state, and the importance of foreign-born doctors to health care in rural communities.

Photo: Joanne Kim
Except for one fleeting moment in 1996, the agencies in charge have operated in virtual silos, failing to coordinate actions or share incontrovertible evidence that the facility was a potential death trap for workers.
"The community as a whole feels terrified and uncertain about their future." (Getty Images)
The negative psychological effects over fear of enforcement actions by ICE agents are being felt most acutely by undocumented parents and parents who have temporary protected status.
Marvin Fong / The Plain Dealer
This reporting is supported by the University of Southern California Center for Health Journalism National Fellowship. Other stories in the series include: Dear Cleveland: To learn, you first have to listen
Paul Wellman
For the past three years, Eddie Hsueh has led a lonely uphill charge within the Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s Office to change the way deputies interact with people with mental illness. It starts with training.
In her final L.A. County-based story, Potts visited a Eisner Health community clinic in Los Angeles County to talk to patients, physicians and administrators about what would happen to patient care if Congress slashed the budget for community health centers.
Sara Terry/VII for Huffpost
The first 1,000 days of nutrition can set a child’s course for life or perpetuate a cycle of poverty.
Randall Benton
When it comes to ensuring children receive key developmental screenings, California is doing a terrible job, according to data and expert interviews.
Courtesy Claudette Higgins
"The longer apart these children are from their parents, the more trauma sets in,” said Andrea Crichlow, a Brooklyn-based social worker from Barbados. Nor does family reunification alone fix the damage.
(John Moore/Getty Images)
Immigrants on edge about broader enforcement under Trump have been skipping appointments and questioning whether enrolling in public health coverage could jeopardize their status.

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