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Fellowship Story Showcase

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As part of the Center for Health Journalism Fellowship, journalists work with a senior fellow to develop a special project. Recent projects have examined health disparities by ZIP code in the San Francisco Bay Area, anxiety disorders and depression in the Hispanic immigrant community in Washington state, and the importance of foreign-born doctors to health care in rural communities.

Navajo actor and health advocate Loren Anthony prepares meals in his house in Gallup, New Mexico. (Photo-Antonia Gonzales)
Through a fellowship with the USC Annenberg-Center for Health Journalism, we travel to LA and look at a program, which is helping ensure babies and parents are safe, healthy, and at the same time connecting them to other Native Americans in the big city.
A girl is examined by a physician’s assistant in Aurora, Colo. (John Moore/Getty Images)
Minnesota officials knew they would exhaust Children’s Health Insurance Program money by the end of this year and likely be out of money for coverage of low-income children and pregnant women by the end of September. And Congress will probably not meet a deadline to help.
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Program participants at a drum and dance class speak about what wellness means to them and how culture is part of their efforts to decrease stress, engage in their community and maintain sobriety.
Dr. Gurraj Singh Bedi, a third year resident at the Mercy Medical Center's Family Practice Clinic.
Even if the county ever gets a medical school, it is a long-term goal years away and many low-income patients need solutions now.
Patients awaiting their doctors appointments in the waiting room of a Livingston Community Health clinic in Livingston on Aug. 3
For years Merced County has struggled to convince doctors to come live and work in the rural, impoverished Central Valley community, resulting in a ratio of about 45 doctors for every 100,000 residents.
Cierra Shelton, 30, a mother of two from Merced insured on Medi-Cal with her 6-month-old son, Jackson Macy.
Horisons Unlimited Health Care filed for bankruptcy and closed all eight of its clinics, including five in Merced County. About 80 percent of Horisons patients were on Medi-Cal.
Brian Komoto, pharmacist and CEO of Komoto Healthcare, runs Komoto Pharmacy in downtown Delano.
A new California law has allowed pharmacists to play a more integral role in managing patients alongside other providers — which could be good news for patients struggling to access doctors. But one major obstacle still stands in the way.
Produced by David Eisenman and Holly Wilhalme with the UCLA Center for Public Health and Disasters.
Some Southern California students spend their days in air conditioning, but others are not so lucky even as temperatures reach over 100 degrees. And those hot classrooms can impact kids' ability to learn.
Dr. Olga Meave sees a patient complaining of shoulder pain.
This reporting was undertaken as part of a project with the USC Center for Health Journalism’s California Fellowship. ...
(Photo: Molly Peterson)
City heat is a growing public health threat. It kills 60 to 70 Angelenos every summer. Even though heat causes more deaths and medical problems than most other natural disasters, it’s rarely identified as the culprit.

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